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Full text of "The Tattler"

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THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1942 



Dedication 



It is with a deep feeling of pride that we dedicate 
this issue of the Tattler to those graduates of our high 
school who are so loyally serving their country in her 
struggle for the preservation of our principles of democ- 
racy. 



ALVAN BARRUS 
ALLEN BISBEE 
R. F. BURKE, JR. 
RONALD EMRICK 
RODNEY GALBRAITH 
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 
CARLTON FIELD 
RICHARD FIELD 
EDWARD FONTAINE 
VARDIC GOLASH 
WALTER GOLASH 
WILLIAM HOWE 
CHESTER KING 
RAYMOND LEE 



BESSIE MURASKI 

GORDON NASH 

HANS NIETSCHE 

FRANCIS PACKARD 

CATHERINE PAUL 

EDWIN RUSSELL 

GEORGE K. RUSTEMEYER 

EDWARD SHEEHAN 

NANCY SHEEHAN 

ROBERT SMILEY 

DAVIS SNOW 
GEORGE WARNER 

LEROY WEEKS 

HOWARD WILSON 



<^01>3 * 



THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief, John Barrus '42 

Assistant Editors, Wilbur Shumway '42, Betty Harlow '43 

Business Manager, Sylvia Clary '42 

Assistants, David West '42, Dorothy Stimson '42 

Alumni Editor, Thelma Packard '42 

Exchange Editor, Mildred Shaw '43 

Sports Editors, Doris Dymerski '42, Edward Golash '42 

Literary Editor, Doris Sincage '42 

Joke Editor, Charles Bartlett '42 

Faculty Adviser, Annetta Barrus 



►<•:♦ 



»<•:♦ 



CONTENTS 

Dedication ......... 1 

Senior Class ......... 4 

Class History 12 

Class Prophecy ........ 13 

Last Will and Testament 14 

Class Grinds 15 

Class Statisitcs ........ 17 

Class of '43 18 

Class of '44 19 

Class of '45 20 

Editorials 21 

Literary .......... 22 

Tattler Staff 29 

Forensic Group 30 

Pro Merito 31 

Baseball ... 32 

Basketball— Boys' 33 

Track 34 

Basketball— Girls' 35 

1942 Theme Song 35 

Alumni Notes 36 




ELIZABETH ALLAIRE 



'As good-natured 



"Betty" 

a soul as e'er trod on shoe of 
leather" 
Refreshment Committee for Prom 3; Ticket Committee 
for N. F. L. 3; Candy Co-Chairman at Basket-ball 
Games 4. 



JOHN BARRUS 



'Johnnie' 



■"As a wit, if not first, in the very first line" 
Editor in Chief of Tattler 4; Glee Club 1, 4; Operetta 
1; Baseball 4. 



CHARLES BARTLETT 



"Buster" 



"But still his tongue ran on, the less of weight it 
bore, with greater ease" 
Assistant Chief Editor of Tattler 3; Joke Editor of 
Tattler 4; Vice President of Forensic League 4; Emer- 
ald Key; Secretary of A. A. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; En- 
trant in State and Pre-State Tournament 3, 4; Oper- 
etta 1; Class Prophecy, Pro Merito 3, 4; Debating 
3, 4. 




I 



ELOISE BARTLETT 



'Wease" 



"She is pretty to walk with, and witty to talk with, 
and pleasant too, to think on" 
Tattler Staff 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 1; Pro 
Merito 3, 4; Class Will. 



MICHAEL BATURA "Micky" 

"He got the better of himself and that's the best kind 
of victory one can wish for" 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; 
Soccer 2, 3; Track 4. 



RUTH BEEBE "Rudy' - 

"She was wont to speak plain to the purpose" 
President 4; Treasurer 3; Forensic Club President 4; 
A. A. Treasurer 4; Entrant in State and Pre-State 
Tournaments 3, 4; N. F. L. Emerald Key; Declama- 
tion 3, 4; Student Coun:il President 4; Debating 4; 
Pro Merito 4; D. A. R. Pilgrim 4; Class Grinds. 



SYLVIA CLARY "Clary" 

"Busy here and there" 
Class Secretary 1; Pro Merito 3, 4; Secretary of Pro 
Merito 3, 4; Executive Committee N. F. L. 3; Entrant 
in State and Pre-State Tournament 3, 4; N. F. L. 
Emerald Key, Declamation 3, 4; Business Manager of 
bating 3, 4; Graduation Speech. 



DORIS DYMERSKI "Dori" 

"I'll speak in a monstrous little voice" 
Vice President 2; Tattler Staff 4; Co-Captain in Basket- 
ball 4; Vice-President of A. A. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Operetta; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 








ROBERT EDWARDS 



Tnut" 



"I agree with no man's opinions. I have some of 
my own" 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 1. 



EDWARD GOLASH 



'Shu-Shu" 



"He that has patience may compass anything" 
Sports Editor of Tattler 4; Captain of Basketball 4; 
President of A. A. 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 
4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 2, 3; Track 4. 



LENA GUYETTE 



'Lena" 



"Gentle of speech, beneficient of mind" 
Pro Merito 3, 4; Class History, Co-Chairman of Candy 
at Basketball Games 4. 



AUDREY JONES 



"Jon" 



"A great step towards independence is a good- 
humored stomach" 

State Speaking Tournament 4; Chairman of N. F. L. 
Food Sale 3. 



MARY KELLOGG "Janie" 

"Variety is the spice of life" 
Glee Club 3, 4; N. F. L. Food Sale Committee 2. 




AMELIA KCLOSEWICZ 



"Millie" 



"Quiet, calm, she seems to be. But there is no girl 
more gay than she' r 
Decorating Prom Committee 3. 



VICTORIA MICHALOSKI 



"Vicki" 



"As a rule men readily believe what they wish to" 
Glee Club 3; School Orchestra 3. 



JOSEPHINE OZIERYNSKI 



Mosie" 



"My memory is so bad that many times I forget 
my own name" 
Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Operetta 1; Forensic Card Party Com- 
mittee 2, 3. 










THELMA PACKARD 



'Pack" 



"Let us then be up and doing with a heart for any 
fate" 
Vice President 1; Historian 3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; 
Vice President of Pro Merito 3, 4; Cheer leader 2, 3; 
Glee Club 1, 2; Operetta 1, Alumni Editor of Tattler 
4; Entrant in State and Pre-State Tournament 4. 




JOHN PAVELCSYK "Pale" 

"All his faults are such that one loves him still the 
better for them" 
Treasurer 1; Operetta 1. 



WILBUR SHUMWAY "Shumski" 

"For every why he had a wherefore" 
Tattler Staff 4; Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Operetta 1; De- 
bating 3, 4. 




DORIS SINCAGE "Sincage" 

"Idleness is not rest, a mind quite vacant is a mind 
distress'd" 
Historian 2; Vice President 3; Treasurer 4; Pro Merito 
3, 4; Pro Merito Treasurer 3, 4; Tattler Staff 3, 4; 
Operetta 1; Graduation Speech. 



CECILIA SOLTYS 



"Ceal" 



"A little nonsense now and then is relished by the 
best of men" 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta 1; Basketball 2, 3. 



DOROTHY CTII.1SON 



"Dot" 



"Whatever she did was done with so much ease, in 
her alone 'twas natural to please" 
Class Secretary 4; Tattler Staff 4; Glee Club 2, 3, 4. 





MARGARET STONE 



Teg" 



"Though on pleasure she was bent, she had a frugal 
mind" 
Glee Club 1; Operetta 1. 



HARRY WARNER 



"Zack" 



"Nothing ever succeeds which exuberant spirits have 
not helped to produce" 
President 2, 3; Vice President 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club 1, 2; Operetta 1; Soccer 2, 3; Basketball 2, 3; 
Track 4. 





10 



THE TATTLER 



JEAN WARNER 



"Jeannie" 



\ f d 



"For she is such a fair girl with ways forever new: 
Her hair is sunlight yellow and eyes a morning 
blue" 
Secretary 2, 3; Pro Merito 3, 4; Pro Merito Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Tattler Staff 3; Glee Club 1; Operetta 1; 
Graduation Speech. 



DAVID WEST "Dippy" 

"To be or not to be, that is the question" 
Assistant Business Manager of Tattler 4; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3, 4 Operetta 1; Declamation 4; Soccer 2, 3; Cheer 
leader 4; School Orchestra 3; Entrant in State and Pre- 
State Tournaments 4. 



MAVIS WICKLAND 



"Mave' 



"Sleep is a gentle thing, beloved from pole to pole" 
N. F. L. Food Sale 2, 3; Music Committee for Senior 
Dance 4. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



11 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT Ruth Beebe 

VICE PRESIDENT Harry Warner 

SECRETARY Dorothy Stimson 

TREASURER Doris Sincage 

CLASS HISTORIAN Thelma Packard 



GRADUATION NIGHT 



CLASS HISTORY 
CLASS PROPHECY 
CLASS GRINDS 
CLASS WILL 



Lena Guyette 

Charles Bartlett 

Ruth Bebee 

Eloise Bartlett 



GRADUATION NIGHT ORATIONS 

Priorities in Education Thelma Packard 

Character and the Schools Doris Sincage 

The Roll of Today's Graduate Jean Warner 

Education and the Future Sylvia Clary 

CLASS MOTTO— Just Beginning 
CLASS GIFT— $50 War Bond for Use of Library 



SENIOR CLASS 



Betty Allaire 
John Barrus 
Charles Bartlett* 
Eloise Bartlett* 
Michael Batura 
Ruth Beebe* 
Sylvia Clary** 
Doris Dymerski 
Robert Edwards 
Edward Golash 
Lena Guyette* 
Audrey Jones 
Mary Kellogg 



Amelia Kolosewicz 

Victoria Michaloski 

Josephine Ozierynski 

**Thelma Packard 

John Pavelcsyk 

Wilbur Shumway 

**Doris Sincage 

Cecelia Soltys 

Dorothy Stimson 

Margaret Stone 

Harry Warner 

**Jean Warner 

David West 



Mavis Wickland 



*Pro Merito 



**High Honor 



12 



THE TATTLER 



Class History 



Four years ago approximately 50 Fresh- 
men noisily climbed the stairs of Burgy High 
for the first time. Although this was a new 
experience for us we soon got on to the cus- 
toms of the s:hool, too soon, perhaps. We 
were determined to make a success of our 
education although having a bit of fun-now 
and then. 

As leaders of this lively class we chose 
as President, David Larkin; Vice President, 
Thelma Packard; Secretary, Sylvia Clary; 
and Treasurer, John Pavelsyck. 

Despite the indignities of initiation at 
Freshmen reception, our spirits were un- 
dampened. Budding athletes included Doris 
Dymerski, Edward Golash, Michael Batura, 
and Harry Warner. 

Vacation came much to our delight, leav- 
ing us with confidence that we were well 
established at dear old Burgy. With ranks 
depleted, but not our enthusiasm, back we 
came in September. Unfortunately, we 
were minus our very dear friend, excellent 
athlete, and jolly classmate, David Larkin, 
who had passed away in August. 

Complete change of officers took effect 
this year with Harry Warner as President; 
Doris Dymerski, Vice President; Jean War- 
ner, Secretary; Dorothy Carney, Treasurer; 
and Doris Sincage, Historian. 

The faculty remained the same with the 
big event of the year being Mr. Foster's 
wedding to Miss Derosia — a grammer school 
teacher. 

Socially, our Sophomore year was highly 
successful with a Valentine Party distin- 
guished for its entertainment and financial 
profit. 

Athletically, our prowess continued, with 
several students, members of the various 
teams.. 

A change in faculty was foretold for the 
next year, when, Miss Walsh, our Eng- 
lish teacher, displayed an emerald-third 
finger, left hand late in the year. 

This was not the only change to greet 
us in September, 1940: our beloved coach, 
Mr. Melody, was in the army and our 
commercial teacher had a position in Spring- 
field. Therefore wo had three new teach- 
ers: Miss Damon for English, Mr. Mul- 
laly for our coach, and Mr. Walker for 
our commercial subjects. 



The roster of officers changed with the 
presence of Ruth Beebe — a new member 
of our class and Thelma Packard. 

Our Basketball Team again went to 
Mass. State Tournament but although we 
put up a good fight we lost to North Brook- 
field. Gold-plated statues were awarded to 
the two senior boys who attended the All 
Star Game. 

We gave an "Old Glory Prom" for the 
seniors and crowned Miss Mary Daniels as 
Columbia. This prom was highly success- 
ful and we made the most money that has 
ever been made in a Burgy Prom. There's 
that class that always does things in a big 
way. 

In the fall of 1941 we were back again 
and this time we were Seniors. It was 
somethings that we had looked forward to 
since our first day of high school. 

We do have the worst luck with our Eng- 
lish teachers tho' always running out on 
us to get married. Miss Damon left us this 
year and in her place we have Miss Barrus. 
Mrs. Warner, for so long our loyal friend 
and teacher, retired this year and we have 
Miss Webber to take her place. 

Two of our basketball players, Edward 
Golash and Michael Batura, attended the 
All Star Game that was held in Ashfield 
and were awarded Gold-plated statues. 

Forensically, our class had its stars also 
with Ruth Beebe, Sylvia Clary, Charles 
Bartlett, and David West representing the 
school at various tournaments. 

This spring Miss Dunphy announced that 
there were eight pro meritos in our class 
and out of that number there were four 
high honor students. We were proud to 
have eight honor students in our class and 
realized that there could have been even 
more. 

1941 and '42 had added significance for us 
as a war year which meant certain sacrifices 
on our part. Despite great plans, we had to 
forego the Prom — and most disappointing 
of all, our New York trip. 

But perhaps, the day will come when we 
will meet again and go on a journey to- 
gether, but until then we will have the 
memory of one big event in our minds. That 
is — the graduation of the class of 1942. 

Lena Guyette 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



Class Prophecy 



It was the year 1973, when I finally had 
the money to take my class trip to New 
York. I had saved up my earnings, $5.60, 
and boarded the Subway at Les Packard's 
store. I gave the ticket man my $.70 fare 
and took my seat. Suddenly, somebody 
tapped me on the shoulder and looking up 
I saw ROBERT EDWARDS dressed in a 
Royal Blue Uniform; on inquiring I found 
that he had joined the R. C. A. F. in 1944, 
and had helped win the war. Now he was a 
General, 4 star. He sat down and told me 
he was planning on taking his trip to New 
York now also. 

We arrived at Grand Central Station and 
took a taxi to the Hotel Costello, Costello 
now being President of the U. S. We took 
rooms and then went out to see the sights; 
he firs thing we saw was DAVID WEST out 
in the middle of the street, blowing a whistle 
and yelling threats to the cars. On seeing us, 
he ran from his beat and shook hands; he de- 
clared that this was the kind of a job he 
liked, making people jump; then remember- 
ing his duties, he ran back and untangled a 
traffic jam. 

Walking up the street laughing, we saw 
a sign "This Shouldn't Happen To You, 
'Use Soapo', the new face cleanser." And 
there on the sign was a picture of ELOISE 
BARTLETT, with a pinched and wrinkled 
expression; we closed our eyes and passed 
on into a News Reel Theater; a picture was 
flashed on the screen: WILBUR SHUM- 
WAY, the concert violinist, was hit by a 
car and fatally injured while crossing 5th 
Avenue. We dried our eyes in time to see 
an old lady get up and start out of the 
theatre, crying violently. It turned to be 
VICTORIA MICHALOSKI, who was Wil- 
bur's wife; we put her in a taxi cab and 
sent her home. 

Looking up the street we saw a big sign 
"Eat at Golash's, 5th Avenue and 42 St." 
So we proceeded down town and sure enough 
there was our old friend, EDWARD 
GOLASH. We shook hands and ate our 
pill dinners and then went out again to 
see the sights. Still on the "Bright White 
Way" we saw another sign, "Paramount 
Theatre": "Williamsburg Steps Out," a 
musical comedy starring SYLVIA CLARY 



and her orchestra with the Haydenville 
Sisters. We decided to go in, and as we 
sat down the show began, we were amazed 
to find that the piano player was none 
other than JOHN BARRUS. I had to hold 
Robert down, because he wanted to jump 
up on the stage and say, "Hello," to our 
classmates. Not that I blamed him though. 
But we were still in for a greater surprise 
for who should the Haydenville sisters turn 
out to be but JOSEPHINE OZIERYNSKI, 
BETTY ALLAIRE, and LENA GUYETTE. 
They sang in beautiful harmony and again 
I had to sit on Robert. Finally the show 
ended and we started up town when whom 
should we meet, but HARRY WARNER. 
He was on a soapbox and giving a speech; 
he told us that he was running for Gov- 
ernor. It didn't seem possible that this 
could be our classmate.. But he treated 
us to cigars and we proceeded still further. 
We started and stopped abruptly for there 
on a sign in front of Carnegie Hall was 
THELMA PACKARD'S picture. And un- 
der it was written "In Person, Sat. Night 
9:00." Accompanied by Rimski Korsakov 
and his Orchestra, Mademoiselle Packard. 
The second Lilly Pons. We entered in time 
to hear Thelma give out on "Ah Sweet 
Mystery of Life," and ended on a selec- 
tion from "Madame Butterfly." Really 
very good, considering. We decided then 
to go to the Stock Club, and whom should 
we find but JOHN PAVELSYCK sitting 
at a table, surrounded by girls. Jump- 
ing up, when he saw us, he introduced 
us to the ladies and then told us that he 
made a million dollars on his new inven- 
tion, a "Back Scrateher." He served us 
refreshments and we continued up the 
street. Whom should we see outside the 
Arcadia Ballroom than Panhandler RUTH 
BEEBE, she turned around and we talked 
and discussed business; she told us hers 
was swell. We got into the Ballroom just 
after they had all left and the washwomen 
were washing and scrubbing the furniture 
and floor. We could hardly believe our 
eyes for there scrubbing away were MAVIS 
WICKLAND and MARGARET STONE 
with the head scrubber, MARY KELLOGG. 
They jumped up on our entering and told 



14 



THE TATTLER 



us that our classmate DOROTHY STIM- 
SON owned the Ballroom, and just then in 
she came. She asked us to come in and 
dance but knowing that she would probably 
charge us double, as we were her friends, 
■we left and continued looking around. Whom 
should we see in front of Duffy's Tavern 
but DORIS SINCAGE and DORIS DYM- 
ERSKI; though they were supposed to be 
eccentric old spinsters, they still loved to 
hear swing played by Teddy Willson. When 
they spied us they picked up their long 
hoop skirts and dashed madly down the 
street and out of sight. Just tben we spied 
a sign "Vaudeville" — step in and see the 
Siamese twins. We stopped to look and 
there was JEAN WARNER and AMELIA 
KOLOSEWICZ. We asked them how they 
happened to be called Siamese twins. Jean 
replied that they needed money, so they 



went to Plastic Surgery and were made 
into Siamese twins. Feeling faint we left 
and quickly walked toward the Plane, when 
somebody safd, "Carry your bags" and there 
stood MICHAEL BATURA, but he was 
merely joking; he was now an executive to 
the Governor's Council, and was now going 
heme on a visit on the same plane that we 
were. As we started to board the plane 
he quickly stopped and introduced his 
wife, whom should it b- but CECILIA 
SOLTYS, the movie star. We took our 
seats and again, I was taken back; ROB- 
ERT'S girl friend AUDREY JONES was 
the pilot. We arrived in Williamsburg in 
about 15 minutes; and saying good-bye 
to all my old friends, I boarded the Rocket 
Ship to Worthington reveling in the fact 
that it really was a class trip after all. 

Charles Bartlett. 



Last Will and Testament 



Be it remembered that we, the senior 
class, of Williamsburg, in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, being of sound 
mind and memory, but knowing the un- 
certainty of this life, do make this our last 
Will and Testament. 

After the payment of our just debts and 
other charges, we bequeath and devise as 
follows: 

To Mr. Merritt we leave a private office 
where he won't be interrupted by Miss 
Dunphy's frequent visitors — and we don't 
mean outsiders. 

To Miss Dunphy we bequeath a governor 
for her car so she will not exceed the speed 
limit. 

To Mr. Foster we bequeath some unbreak- 
able lab equipment for his Chemistry Class 
next year. 

Miss Barrus is left a temperature gauge 
to use in next year's Senior English Class 
— and we don't mean to take the tempera- 
ture of the room. 

To Mr. Walker we leave some wave set 
to help him to rearrange that lovely wave 
of his anytime he wishes. 

To Miss Webber we leave padlocks for 
her windows so she won't have to be con- 
tinually keeping the pupils from leaning out. 

Mr. Mullaly is left a $25 War Bond to 
buy himself one of the later model cars. 



Betty Allaire and Lena Guyette bequeath 
their places as class man-haters to Mary 
Noyes and Lorraine Jones. 

To Neil Damon — John Barrus wills his 
position on the clean-up committee. 

Charles Bartlett wills his place as Excuse 
Warden for the Student Council to anyone 
who wishes an outlet for their meanness? 

Michael Batura leaves his place as flower 
boy to Donald Wickland.. We hope he uses 
it to as good advantage as Mike did. 

Ruth Beebe leaves her silent feet to 
Marion Culver. 

Sylvia Clary leaves her frankness to 
Bessie Batura. 

Doris Dymerski and Cecelia Soltys leav* 
their fits of giggles to Helen Carver and 
Edna Shaw respectively. 

Robert Edwards and Harry Warner leave 
their numerous hunting trips to anyone who 
can get away with it as well as they did 
during school hours. 

To Malvina Brisbois, Amelia Kolosewicz 
leaves some of her weight. 

To Jean Crone, Josephine Ozierynski 
leaves her forgetfulness. 

Edward Golash leaves his "way with the 
women" to George Molloy. 

Mary Kellogg wishes to leave her danc- 
ing ability to anyone who thinks she can 
take her place. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



15 



Audrey Jones wills the name, Johnny, 
to Betty Damon. 

To Ruth Carver, Victoria Michaloski 
leaves some of her long hair. 

Thelma Packard and Mavis Wickland 
leave the "boys" from Windsor to Carolyn 
Emerson and Milly Hayden. 

To Donald Campbell, John Pavelsyck wills 
his well kept hair. 

To Tux Thayer, Wilbur Shumway leaves 
his Latin ability. 

Doris Sincage leaves her long finger nails 
to anyone who thinks she could keep them 
as well as Doris does. 

Jean Warner leaves her marvelous me- 
mory to Wallace Jarvis. 

Margaret Stor? leaves her place in 
Geography Class to anyone who thinks they 
can fool away as much time as she has 
and yet pass. 

To Norma Wells, Dorothy Stimson wills 
some of her sophistication. 

David West bequeaths his reverend like 
attitude to his brother Kenneth West. 

To the Class of '43 we bequeath the right 
to be called dignified seniors, hoping they 
will use it as well as we have. 



We nominate and appoint Lucius Jenkins 
sole Executor of this, our last Will and 
Testament; hereby revoking all other Wills 
and Codicils by us heretofore made. 

In testimony whereof, we hereunto set 
our hand, and in the presence of these 
witnesses, declare this to be our last Will, 
this eighteenth day of June, in the year of 
our lord one thousand nine hundred and 
forty -two. 

The Senior Class of 1942. 

On this eighteenth day of June, A.D. 1942, 
the Senior Class of Williamsburg High 
School, Williamsburg, Massachusetts, signed 
the foregoing instrument in our presence, 
declaring it to be their last Will, and as 
witnesses thereof, we three do now, at their 
request, in their presence, and in the pres- 
ence of each other, hereto subscribe our 
names. 

Hirohito 
Adolph Hitler 
Benito Mussolini 

By Eloise Bartlett 



Class Grinds 



Do you think you know each student here? 

Are their faces recognized? 
Whoever believes he knows them best 

Should be told they are disguised. 

Perhaps you wonder how 

The faces that you see 
Could possibly express a change 

From soberness to glee. 

But if you saw them at work and play, 

For four long years, at most; 
Then you'd be qualified to tell 

Tales of which they do not boast. 

Now take Dave West, for example, 
Let's see, it happened back in May, 

Would you believe he caused a riot 
In our English class, one day? 

For four long years the major possessor 
Of the title "Most Beautiful Girl" 

Has been held by Eloise Bartlett 
Who can get any man in a "swirl." 



Harry Warner is the lad 

Who comes from Mountain Street; 
And boy! can he attract the girls, 

That, in itself, is quite a feat. 

Doris Sincage is our little miss 
Who walks away with every A, 

But did you know that in English class 
She made three errors in just one day? 

Who has the finest taste in dress? 

Whose hair will always look so neat ? 
Who is it walks and talks just so? 

That's our Dot, you know, from Nash 
Street. 

Man-Haters Title was held by two, 

Until the election took place, 
Betty and Lena were neck n' neck, 

But Betty took First in the race. 

Now Margaret, I feel sorry for you 
Since gas rationing took place, 

For Chesterfield is quite a way 
For a Haydenville boy to ra°e. 



16 



THE TATTLER 



Now Johnnie's a boy from Goshen, 
And he has the fairest blue eyes, 

They're always seeking a junior lass, 
And someday, her love, may he realize. 

Quiet and serene, she seems, 

Innocent and calm, her face, 
But "Millie's" only thinking of 

Some prank which just took place. 

Mavis has hair of flaxen gold, 

Eyes of the bluest hue, 
She's interested in a Junior lad 

So her school studies were few. 

Some say "Wilbur really studies," 
Others say "He'll simply fool." 

I doubt both of these since I believe 
He day dreams of a girl in school. 

Playful are her ways. Oh yes! 

Cute as cute can be, 
That's Thelma, Juliet of us all, 

Now where can Romeo be? 

Who's always passing some new bluff? 

Who's full of "pep" and "vigor"? 
That's Charlie with his vitamin plus, 

The teachers say he's hard to figure. 

Jeanie with the dark brown hair, 
That's not a revised song of old, 

But a cheerful, playful, ever sweet girl; 
A charming lass, we're told. 

The blues will be departing 

And you will softly sigh 
When Vickie Mickaloski 

Starts beating out the jive. 



A flash came in 'bout one minute to nine, 

You wonder who it was, 
Then you hear Sylvia bluff, 

"Last night I was late but for a good 
cause." 

Usually for flowers, to a florist we'd go, 
Then Audrey might supply the need, 

But since our "Mike" now carries flowers 
To him we give our heed. 

Did you hear a giggle just then? 

I did, but I'm not much surprised 
For I know it's hard for Cecille 

Not to let a giggle arise. 

On a basketball floor Doris steals the show, 

In school she's a lot of fun, 
For "Doris" and "Josie" combined 

Can easily out do anyone. 

Mary Kellogg takes in every dance, 
Capturing partners is her art, 

It's Jim, then Dick, then Harry, then Tom, 
And from them all does she hate to part. 

Why Johnnie fishes, I don't know, 
But I see him with his bait and line, 

Now if he threw a different line, 

I know some hearts he would entwine. 

Now I've let you in on the secrets 

That for four long years we've held, 

You see there are no angels, 

At times to behave, we were compelled. 

But time and tide can wait for no man 

Hence; we graduate tonight, 
Some memories we leave behind 

Others — keep to make our future bright. 

Ruth Beebe. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 



Class Statistics 



Prettiest Girl 
Handsomest Boy 
Most Popular Girl 
Most Popular Boy 
Best Girl Dancer 
Best Boy Dancer 
Best Dressed Girl 
Best Dressed Boy 

Noisiest Students 

Quietest Student 
Class Vamp 
Class Sheik 
Smartest Student 
Best Girl Athlete 
Best Boy Athlete 
Best All-Round Student 
Man Hater 
Woman Hater 
Class Poet 
Class Musician 
Cutest Girl 
Cutest Boy 



Eloise Bartlett 

John Pavelsyck 

Ruth Beebe 

Harry Warner 

Mary Kellogg 

David West 

Dorothy Stimson 

Charles Bartlett 

Doris Dymerski 

Robert Edwards 

David West 

Lena Guyette 

Mary Kellogg 

Charles Bartlett 

Doris Sincage 

Doris Dymerski 

Edward Golash 

Ruth Beebe 

Elizabeth Allaire 

Wilbur Shumway 

David West 

David West 

Thelma Packard 

Harry Warner 



Class Gossip Victoria Michaloski 

Student Most Likely to Succeed 

Sylvia Clary 
Student With Most Pleasing 

Personality Ruth Beebe 

Class Wit Charles Bartlett 

Jolliest Student Cecilia Soltys 

Most Bashful Student John Pavelsyck 

Most Business-Like Student Sylvia Clary 
Model Student Ruth Beebe 

Most Sophisticated Student 

Dorothy Stimson 



Most Careful Student 
Class Actress 
Class Singer 
Class Orator 
Favorite Gum 
Favorite Sport 
Favorite Subject 
Favorite Actor 
Favorite Actress 
Favorite Class Actor 
Favorite Orchestra 
Average Age — 17 



Doris Sincage 

Ruth Beebe 

Doris Dymerski 

Sylvia Clary 

Dentyne 

Baseball 

Typing 

Errol Flynn 

Joan Fontaine 

Charles Bartlett 

Artie Shaw 



1. English IV 



PET ABOMINATIONS 
2. Student Council 



3. Current Events 



-'Quiet Please" 
"Tropical Magic" 



1942 Theme Songs 



Miss Barrus 
Mr. Foster 

"Blues in the Night" Student Council 

"Happy In Love" Thelma Packard 

"21 Dollars a Day Once A Month" 

Mr. Walker 
"This Love Of Mine" Clarice Graves 

"That Solid Old Man" Bernard Cross 

"I'm just wild about Harry" 

Charlotte Brooks 
"My Old Jalopy" Mr. Mullaly 



"Let's Give Love A Chance" 

Donald Campbell-Dot Pringle 
"Pretty Little Busybody" Doris Sincage 
"Day Dreaming' 
"Cash for your Trash" 
"Two in Love" 
"Breathless" 

"Arthur Murray Taught Me Dancing 

In A Hurry" Mary Kellogg 

"Amen" David West 

"Your Feets Too Big" John Barrus 



George Molloy 

The Seniors 

Arlene Sabo 

Miss Webber 



18 



THE TATTLER 




Front Row: Bette Lou Harlow, Norma Wells, Geneva Graves, Mary Bowker, 
Charlotte Otis, Mildred Shaw, John O'Brien, Frostine Graves, Jean Crone, Roger 
King, and Joseph Haigh. 

Second Row: June Colburn, Arlene Sabo, Irene Metz, Betty Damon, Mary Noyes, 
Carolyn Emerson, Helen Carver, Shirley Knight, Edna Shaw, Elinor Rhoades, 
Lorena Nietsche, Marion Culver, William Bisbee, Warren Brisbois. 

Third Row: Lucius Jenkins, Millard Hathaway, Donald Wickland, Donald Camp- 
bell, Lester Shaw, Robert Munson, and Frank Munson. 

Absent: Bernice Golash and George Molloy. 



Class of 1943 



PRESIDENT, Charlotte Otis 
VICE PRESIDENT, John O'Brien 



TREASURER, Jean Crone 
SECRETARY, Mildred Shaw 



HISTORIAN, Frostine Graves 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 




Front Row: Alfred Judd, Marion Sylvester, Agnes Matrishon, Charlotte Brookes, 
Margaret Ryan, Clarice Graves, Donald Harry, John Polwrek, Donna Hobbs, Robert 

Algustoski, Edward Sincage. 
Second Row: Karl Hillenbrand, Francis O'Brien, Norman Bates, Phyllis Granger, 

Marion Warner, Ruth Munson, Eleanor Eddy, Marguerite Pomeroy, Ruth Carver, 

Frederick Roth. 

Third Row: Justin Stone, Howard O'Brien, Merton Nye, Harlan Nye. 

Absent: Thomas Algustoski, Rene Demarais, Margaret Johnson, James McAllister. 



* * * 



Class of 1944 



PRESIDENT, Donald Harry SECRETARY, Charlotte Brookes 

VICE PRESIDENT, John Polwrek TREASURER, Clarice Graves 

HISTORIAN, Margaret Ryan 



20 



THE TATTLER 




Front Row: Phyllis Rhoades, Lorraine Jones, Bessie Batura, Shirley Golash, 
Kathleen Allaire, Rita Lupien, Barbara Cone, Dorothy Pringle, Malvina Brisbois. 
Virginia Wychoff, Louise Newell, Mary Lou Bisbee, Elsa Lloyd. 

Second Row: Henry Brisbois, Beverly Cole, Mildred Hayden, Ruth La Casse, Eva 
Sanderson, Ruth Mollison, Lawrence Packard, Katharine Ingellis, Jeanette Deaton. 
Mathew Ingellis, Barry Purrington, Felix Brisbois. 

Third Row: Wallace Jarvis, Kenneth West, Clifford Thayer, Bernard Cross. 

Absent: Neil Damon, Hazel Hillenbrand, Albert Kopka, Winona Mathers, and Irene 
Nye. 



Class of 1945 



PRESIDENT, Neil Damon SECRETARY, Mary Lou Bisbee 

VICE PRESIDENT, Barry Purrington TREASURER, Barbara Cone 

HISTORIAN, Albert Kopka 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



21 



Editorials 



RIGHT TO SUCCESS 

About 27 years ago, there was a boy born 
into this world and if you had asked anyone 
at that time of his chance of success in life 
they would have said, "He has no future." 
Joe Louis is just one example of a child born 
under this feeling that negroes could not be 
successful. Every person born of the black 
race is born with an extra burden on his 
shoulders for not only must he struggle up 
the ladder of success but must defeat the 
menace which comes from white people 
feeling superior. Therefore when these 
people make a success of their lives we 
should not scorn them — as so many people 
do — but praise them all the more in the 
victory. Especially is this true in these 
times of stress when opposing forces are 
trying to stir up trouble betwen different 
races, religions and other factions, we 
should realize that this is just what the 
fifth columnists want — uncooperation, trou- 
ble and bitterness which goes with it. Other 
famous negroes that have become leaders in 
their respective fields are: Booker T. Wash- 
ington — education, Duke Ellington — music, 
Jessie Owens — athletics, Marion Anderson — 
music. They are looked up to and idolized 
by those of their race just as we glory in the 
success of F. D. Roosevelt, Abe Lincoln, 
Joe Dimaggio and Lily Pons. The race pre- 
judice has never been so strong — even in 
this war — against any other people and if 
this war — fought for democracy — is not to 
be in vain we must teach our people to res- 
pect the black race. 

Doris Sincage '42. 

OUR PART 

The future of the students of high schools 
is one of uncertainty and hard labor. Proba- 
bly most of the students will be in some 
war work of one kind or another, be it 
fighting or working in a factory or on a 
farm. No one could expect to live through 
this crisis without doing something for their 
country. Also it has been said that after 
this war it will be the present high school 
students that will have to build up the 
world and make it a better place to live in. 

With this important job before us, there 



is need for everyone of us to work now, 
in school and also outside, to learn the 
problems and to find ways to solve these. 
If everyone of us do our part now we will 
have an easier time later. 

Of course we sincerely hope that the 
war will be over in a short time and that 
this country will be victorious. But to 
have this come about we will have to do 
our part. Every one of us. 

John D. Barrus '43. 

POSITION 

The other afternoon I was having my 
graduation dress altered. As I stood there 
in the little fitting room at the back of the 
shop the realization suddenly came to me 
that this woman was an extremely skilled 
worker. Here in this dingy little space she 
toiled day after day, turning out work which 
went a long way toward the popularity of 
the dress shop. Very few of the hundreds 
who came to the store's counters ever came 
in contact with her but it was her pressing, 
her sewing, and her altering that made the 
finished gown so attractive to the feminine 
eye. 

So it is in every walk of life. The ones 
who concentrate all their energy on produc- 
ing a perfect piece of work seldom get the 
credit for it. It's not the carpenter, the 
mason, the electrician, or plumber who is 
praised for the work he has put into the 
construction of a sturdy building. Neither 
is it the shoveler, gardener, nor teamster 
who gets the credit for the landscaping 
which forms the beautiful setting for the 
well constructed house. It is the owner of 
the property who receives the praise and the 
credit. 

Today we are all familiar with the expres- 
sion of "the man behind the man behind the 
Guns". The soldier would be useless with- 
out him and in this day of modern mechini- 
zation he is doubly important. However, in 
this case, it is not even the soldier who reaps 
the harvest of credit but a single man — the 
commander. Every hour they are dying on 
bloody battle fields throughout the world. 
The papers say a thousand were bombed or 

(Continued on Page 37) 



22 



THE TATTLER 



Literary 



SPRING 

The cherry blossoms bloom 

And fragrant is the air; 

Down by the brook, the bluebirds sing, 

And there're mayflowers everywhere. 

The maple is springing her little green buds, 
The air with perfume is laden; 
put in the brush the sparrows chirp 
The tune of spring, in their haven. 

'A tiny blue violet opens its eyes 
Drowsy from a long winter's sleep; 
Put in the woods the squirrels play, 
With a jump and a swirl and a leap. 

Then, hurrah for the spring with its new- 
born life, 
Its love, its joy, and its laughter; 
The children sing the echoes of spring 
For many days after. 

Edna Shaw '43 

THE BARNDANCE 

Tune up the old banjos, boys, 

Tune up the violins, 
For all the folks are gathering, 

To shake their rusty limbs. 

The music starts to playing, 

And Jetty plays the bones, 
And everyone whose in the hall, 

Will dance the old "Paul Jones." 

Young Jimmy from across the hall, 

Blushes from head to heel, 
And goes to ask Miss Mary Dee, 

To dance the "Virginia Reel." 

Juddy Skimp, the banker's son, 

Who gossips all the news, 
Sits in the corner all alone, 

Because of brand new shoes. 

Lame old Grampa Skinner, 

Who seemed to dance with glee, 

Tries to do the darn old thing, 
The kids call "Boogie-Woogie." 

And there is Julia Snooty, 

With all those nice new clothes, 

But she can't dance this square with Jake, 
Psst — there's a run in her hose, 



And everything from eight til twelve, 

Just seemed to go right fine, 
And it looks like old Aunt Suzy, 

Had more than a crick in her spine. 

And now we say "goodnight" to you. 

With all our aches and pains, 
And only hope you'll join us, 

When we have a barndance again. 
Bette Lou Harlow '43 

THE CANDID CAMERA 

What goes everywhere, sees all, 
Winter, summer, spring or fall? 
What records the happy times 
Everyone has in their minds? 
What sees children playing hard 
In the park or in the yard? 

—The Candid Camera! 
What peaks into the actor's home, 
Or the Senator's, widely known? 
What catches beauties on the beach, 
Or the clothes hung out to bleach? 
What takes in the landscape scenes, 
Mountains, valleys, lakes and streams? 

— The Candid Camera! 
What snapped Tokle on his skis, 
And saw the Dean hand out degrees? 
What records the golfer's wrath, 
And the caddy's hearty laugh? 
What watches the freshmen's silly wiles, 
And the blushing maiden's smiles? 

— The Candid Camera! 
What gets all the squares and curves 
And gets on the people's nerves? 
What angers the fireman and cop 
When everyone wants to get a shot? 
What does modern youth like most — 
What's the fad from coast to coast? 

— The Candid Camera! 

Carolyn Emerson '43 

REMEMBER BATAAN 

Douglas MacArthur, — he held them, 
With his boys so gallant and true. 

They fought with undying valor 
For the red, white, and blue. 

Douglas MacArthur departed, 

On a boat and a plane in the dark. 

Wainwright came and darted, 
To keep live his spark. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



The Japs came on at length, 

And with their many men, 
Drove our tired heroes 

Toward the bitter end. 

Outnumbered and entrapped, 

Our boys were in a plight. 
MacArthur said, "I'll come back 

And put them all to flight.'.' 

Remember this, Mr. Tojo, 

MacArthur and we are mad, 
Because of the attack on Pearl Harbor, 

And you shall soon be sad. 

America is gathering 

Around our boys so true, 
To uphold the ideals of freedom, 

And our own red, white, and blue. 

William Bisbee '43. 

"THE MORNING AFTER" 

The alarm clock rings with all its might 
8:15 — Why it's really the middle of the 

night; 
Then, though half asleep, you raise your 

head, 
Summon all your will power and get out of 

bed. 

Holy Moses! but you sure do look a sight! 
But that's what comes from dancing half 
the night; 

You hurriedly dress, for anything will do — 

Everyone else was up last night — same as 
you. 

You spend ten minutes trying to comb your 

hair 
And then only to discover your sock has a 

tear; 

Your mother calls to give you fair warning, 

Why must everything go wrong on such a 
morning ? 

You gulp down your coffee and swallow 

your toast 
And now you are ready! Well, anyway, 

almost — 
You grab your book with homework half 
done, 

You're out the door and down the street 
on a run. 



You finally make it with two minutes to 
spare, 

You hate the teachers and you're cross as 
a bear; 

In the middle of English, you fall sound 
asleep 

And now after school the floor you must 
sweep. 

You forget to laugh at the teacher's corn, 

And say 63 B.C. was when Caesar was born, 

You're wrong again, just listen to the 
laughter 

That's the way things go on 'The Morning 
After'. 

Thelma Packard '42 



"MAH GUN" 

Ah sets mah gun upon mah knee, 

An as ah fondles it: somewheres in me ah 
feel the flow of mem'ry. 

Mah eyes get dim and they kinda water up 

They ain't so good as they used tuh be, 

An ah gets to thinkin' of them times 

A'huntin' for the birds an' rabbits, 

The time we got losted up in the scrub 

country, 
An how ah talked to mah gun as if twer 

alive 
An' how it kinda kept me company. 
Ah kinda squints mah eyes to shake the 

dimness out; 
An tears come tricklin' down mah cheeks 

an' nose. 
Lord! Ah can't be cryin', a big grown man 

like me 
At just the simple mem'rys of what used 

tuh be: 
But ah'll soon be joinin' them mem'rys, 
Them mem'rys of what used tuh be. 
But Lord, ah asks one favor upon mah 

bendin' knee. 
An thats when ah joins the other world, 
That world of right an' good, 
You'll let me roam the fields an' meadows 

with that gun, 
That rusyt gun that's on mah knee. 

John Pavelcsyk '42 



24 



THE TATTLEK 



THE MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY 

This is the confession of a traitor. I am 
the supervisor of clerks in the office of 
a big line of passenger ships in New York. 
I came to the United States ten years ago 
from Germany. I was naturalized in 1935. 
I have one brother who is fifteen years 
younger than I. I have raised him since 
he was five. He is the only person in the 
world who ever liked me. He is what they 
call a "swell kid" here in New York. Karl 
has been in the navy ever since he was 
old enough. Me, I don't believe in that 
patriotic drivel. 

However, to get on with my story, rather 
confession, my company has been changing 
liners into troop ships ever since Decem- 
ber 7th. 

Three weeks ago, while I was in a bar 
around the corner drinking a beer — it had 
been dry work that day — a man came up 
to me and offered me a drink. Who am I 
to turn down a free drink? While I was 
enjoying it, this fellow asked me if my 
name was Ernest Schultz. I said yes. He 
asked me who would win the war. Thinking 
he was just making conversation and afraid 
of making him angry, I said, America. He 
said that I needn't be afraid of him, that 
he was a "right guy," and to tell him my 
real opinion. I said that Mitler would win 
without doubt. Why, with Japan keeping 
the Americans busy in the East, Hitler had 
an easy job in the West. He asked me 
whether I had ever considered what would 
happen to me when the Nazis took over. He 
said that all people who had not helped the 
Nazi cause would become slaves. I replied 
that I had never thought of that. He pulled 
me over into a booth and told me that his 
organization had picked me out for a cer- 
tain job because they knew I was of Ger- 
man birth. He told me that when the 
Nazis took over it would be possible for 
me to have control of a district if I helped 
the Vaterland now. I, also would be paid 
vor every assignment that I completed. 
How could I forsee in what manner I would 
be paid. Because I had no love for the 
country that looked down upon me as an 
ignorant foreigner, I assented. All that 
I had to do was fake extra work the next 
night and stay at the office a little late. 
Then I was to let an agent in so that he 
could pick the safe and copy some papers 



that I had seen put in there three days 
ago. The stupid pigs weren't smart enough 
to keep me from knowing that they con- 
cerned some transport movements which 
were to take place. It was successful. What 
an easy way to make money! 

Yesterday, I received two letters. In one 
there was five hundred dollars for my work, 
in the other, this . . . 

"The War Department regrets to inform 
you that your brother, Karl Schultz, was 
killed five days ago on convoy duty. His 
ship, while guarding some transports, was 
torpedoed and sunk." 

This confession was found beside the body 
of a man discovered in his apartment, with 
a bullet through his head and a revolver in 

Jean Crone '43 

AFTER A SNOWSTORM 

As I sit here and gaze out over the snow 
covered fields and woodland a deep feeling 
of serene quiet and peace creeps over all. 
The only sounds breaking the white silence 
are the dripping of the water from the eaves 
where the afternoon sun is melting the snow 
and the other — the slow rattle of cooking 
utensils in the kitchen. 

The sky is gray with only a few scattered 
patches of blue like the blades of grass in 
early spring which creep forth from 
amongst the melting snow drifts. On the 
western horizon over Battlecock hang a few 
heavy wind clouds. There are long gray 
shadows on the snow. Once in awhile a 
breeze sweeps across the knoll and the snow 
is set a-dancing so that the shadows are 
changed. 

At present the air is still and the tense 
feeling that comes just before a storm, 
sometimes takes precedence over the quiet, 
sleepy feeling with which I am impregnated. 
From the bare deep purple hue of the forest 
covered mountain we realize that the wind 
must have swept over these trees some time 
after the storm and relieved the bending 
branches of their coverlet of white fleece. 

Now the sun comes out and the soft gray 
shadows are changed to distinctive blue 
ones. We perceive the blue-jays feasting on 
a few apples which we failed to pick from 
the nearby fruit tree. 

What could be more peaceful or friendly 
than such a scene ? 

Sylvia Clary '42 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



IT DID HAPPEN HERE 

The whole world had changed, or so it 
seemed to John Hill, who had been attend- 
ing Williamsburg High School now for six 
months; and had never before witnessed 
such events as were going on there to-day. 
In the first place, John didn't even remem- 
ber how he got to the red brick building, 
but what was worse, everyone in room six 
was in the wrong seat. John was puzzled, 
but he shrugged his shoulders with, "An- 
other idea of Mr. Moriarty's." Just then 
he felt a hand on his shoulder. It was Mr. 
Moriarty, who informed him that he had 
changed all the home room seats. His new 
place was directly in front of the desk. He 
looked around for Cone and West, but they 
evidently weren't in the room anymore. All 
girls around him; how could he stand just 
girls for five minutes? 

The chime sounded, and everyone arose 
for classes. A chime? Bewildered, John 
looked at Mr. Moriarty, who smiled and 
said, "We are starting a new system at high 
school to-day." At the door, he bumped into 
his pal, Bob Toski. Toski grabbed him by 
the arm, and with a tone of authority: "Lis- 
ten, Hill, go right into the office and check 
in. I am Miss Donnelly's new secretary and 
things are going to be done right around 
here." Our friend was so astonished that 
he practically fell down the stairs in his 
hurry to "check in," which duty he had been 
neglecting daily. 

John walked into room one for spelling 
class. At the desk, sat Miss Clary, Mr. 
Meredith's new secretary. When the room 
was quiet, or as quiet as could be expected 
with Golash and Dymerski there, Miss Clary 
stood up. In her hand, she held the new 
hand math book. John was confused, so 
confused with this set-up, that he fairly 
shouted at the new teacher: "Say, where 
did the spelling class go to?" 

John learned that spelling was in room 
six, and that room one was now being used 
for Miss Clary's math class. When he 
arrived in room six, the phonograph was 
playing. John hesitated at the door. Music ? 
— But there was Mr. Meredith with the 
spelling book. He chose a seat near the 
window; it would be easier to get out if 
there should be a riot or fire. 

"The 'i' before the V except after 'c'," 



Mr. Meredith chanted in perfect rhythm 
with the strains of the "Marseillaise," while 
he tapped the floor with the right foot. 
The class repeated in the same sing-song 
fashion. "The 'i' before the V except after 
'c', as in believe, b-e-1-i-e-v-e, and receive, 
r-e-c-e-i-v-e." 

A sudden bang outside the window. A 
pair of high heels, legs — and there was a 
girl seated in a swinging chair with a 
huge cloth and a bottle of window cleaner 
in her hands. She was evidently being 
let down the roof by a pulley. John just 
stared. Mary Bowker woke him with a 
poke. "It's Miss Barnes," she said, "She's 
working her way through college." 

Then Mr. Meredith said, "Is there any 
discussion?" John looked around for Don 
Harry; surely Harry had a question or 
suggestion. There sat Don in the back 
of the room without a word to say. A 
sound of the chime — the class was ex- 
cused. 

Typing was next. Strange — he found 
his classmates in their usual seats and 
in the regular typing room, too. Was that 
Joe Haigh in the front row with the horn- 
rimmed glasses? Mr. Haigh arose and 
stood before the class. When he had es- 
tablished order, he started the phonograph. 
The class began to type to the "Merry 
Widow Waltz." John glanced at his printed 
copy. A foreign language. Italian, he 
thought. The copy of the girl next to him 
was in Italian, also. After fifteen min- 
utes, Haigh stopped the music. John counted 
his words. One-hundred and thirty-six 
with no errors. He must have made a 
mistake. John counted them again. Still 
one-hundred and thirty-six. "How did you 
do?" he said to his neighbor, who he noticed 
was none other than Miss Webb. "Only 
thirty-two with five, today," she said. John 
smiled; someone was kidding him. 

John dashed up to the front desk. "Say, 
Joe, could you — " "Mr. Haigh, please," Joe 
corrected sternly. Mr. Haigh looked over 
John's paper and without surprise said, 
"Much better, Mr. Hill." "But I did one- 
hundred and thirty-six with no errors." 
John fairly screamed. "Nothing so un- 
usual. Take your seat, please," said his 
one-time classmate. 

There was more typing. Suddenly, John 
felt something hit him lightly on the back 



26 



THE TATTLER 



of the head.. "Field throwing spit-balls 
again," he thought, and didn't turn around 
to see. Then another wad of paper, and 
another — then an eraser shot over the top 
of his head. John swung around in his 
chair and caught Mr. Moriarty with his 
arms raised above his typewriter, about to 
snap a wad of paper from an elastic. Mr. 
Moriarty — well of all things. Mr. Haigh 
boomed out. "Moriarty, you'll stay at 
three." 

John found Williamsburg High School 
had a new class — filing class. "Well, I'll 
try it," puzzled John. It was held in the 
assembly. In the front of the room stood 
Jean Crone. "Filing class has begun," she 
announced, "We will now file out onto the 
front steps. "Evidently it was not strange 
to the others; John followed them out. 

"I forgot my nail file," O'Brien whisp- 
ered to John on the way out. John did 
not ask 'why' or 'what for'. O'Brien con- 
tinued, "She will probably throw me out 
of class for forgetting it again." 

"Mr. Hill, where is your uniform?" Miss 
Crone demanded, when all had reached the 
front steps and were standing in perfect 
order. Their right hands were on their 
hips and their lefts, in the air, holding files, 
which glittered like swords in the sun. 
"Uniform?" he looked at the others. Sure 
enough, they were all wearing kaki military 
outfits. 

"John, this is the last time I shall call 
you," said the voice, "Get out of bed this 
minute; you'll be late for school." Now 
he knew; it was the voice of his mother. 

"I've been to school," John said, "I came 
home to get my uniform and nail file." 
From his mother: "Your what?" 

It was then that John Hill really awoke 
and realized he had been dreaming. "Are 
you all right?" His mother seemed anxious. 

"Yeah, Mom, just don't tell me we have 
strawberry pie and chicken dumplings for 
breakfast." 

Betty Damon, '43. 

REFLECTIONS OF A DAD AS HIS SON 
GOES OFF TO WAR 

We were all in the kitchen just before 
Don left, I don't know why, but we were 
all there. Mom was there, Don was there, 
I was there and so was little sister. I 



was leaning against the stove, my favorite 
position, and Don was leaning against the 
sink, his favorite position, and Mom was 
in a chair, calm as always, and little Sis 
was leaning on the back of Mom's chair. 
None of us said a word, we didn't need 
to. We all had the same thought in our 
mind, namely: how we would miss Don 
after he was gone. Mom would miss a 
cheerful, carefree, happy son, I would miss 
a companion, Sis would miss his reading her 
the nightly bedtime story. We would all 
miss him, I guess. Even Rags, the homely 
puppy, that Don had found only a few 
months ago, wet and bedraggled and had 
brought home, teasing us much to my 
distaste, but now to my favor. 

Soon outside we heard the toot of a horn 
and Don stood up and said, "Well, I guess 
that is for me," and grabbed his few be- 
longings that he was going to take with 
him and came over to me. He held out 
his hand and said, "Well, Dad, take care 
of yourself, but for God's sake, stop look- 
ing so sour." All of a sudden I seemed 
to have lost my voice and all that I could 
tease out of it was a "Good luck, Son." 
He went over to Mom and gave her a kiss 
and with a grin said, "No bawling now." 
He then went to Sis and gave her a kiss 
and said, "Be a good girl now, won't you?" 
We all followed him out to the front door 
to see him jump in the car and with a 
cheerful greeting to the fellows already in 
the car, he turned around and cheerily 
called, "So long folks." Somehow none of 
us answered him except little Sis, who 
called out, "Bye Donny." The car went 
off with a roar with all of us waving to 
him and this time saying "Good bye." 

As we slowly walked back into the kit- 
chen, I noticed on the back of one chair 
the old, battered hat that he used to wear 
all of the time. Somehow that old hat 
looked lonesome, I didn't know why, be- 
cause many a time I had seen it there and 
it never looked lonesome then, but now 
it did. Strange how things will appear 
different when they are still the same. I 
carefully picked it up and brushed it off, I 
doubt if it ever got such gentle treatment 
in a long time, but I carefully put it where 
it would never get crushed. 

Well, I thought, he is gone now. Gone 
with a cheery grin and a wave of the hand. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 



careless as ever. And somehow, I could 
not help thinking of this same boy, the 
one now wearing the uniform of the U. S. 
Army, and how, when the Armistice was 
signed in the last War, the War to end 
all Wars, he stood in his little sailor's 
uniform and waved his flag at all the pass- 
ing soldiers and had said to me, "Someday 
I am going to be like thems, too Poppy." 
I had thought little of it then, but now it 
was a horrible reality. I began to wish 
that somehow my son could have been 
spared from going, but then I said to 
myself, "Cut it out, you old softy, you 
are not the only one to sacrifice your son 
for freedom," and I began to be a little 
glad that I was doing my part, however 
little, by sacrificing a son. No doubt I am 
not the only Dad who watched with regret 
his son's departure off to fight the forces 
of evil with evil. 

Roger King '43 



THE LETTER 

Somewhere on the vast expanse of the 
ocean, crept a ship, under the brilliance 
of a full moon. Inside sat a youth writing. 

"Dear mom," said the letter, "Please 
don't worry about me. I get plenty to 
eat and, although it isn't cooked like back 
on the farm it's sure good for an empty 
stomach." 

"I got the gloves you sent. My hands 
keep plenty warm now. Honest, I don't 
know how I went without them before." 

"How is Sally? I have her picture with 
me, every minute, next to my heart. It sort 
of gives me courage to keep on and wait 
for the day well be together again. I 
sure do miss her. How often I think of 
the days we spent planning things like 
our marriage, the house I'd build, and how 
many rooms we'd have in it. Funny, how 
many fellows here think of the same things. 
And, mom, tell her I haven't got a girl in 
every port, but am just saving all my love 
for her. 

"The trip's been very dull, haven't even 
been seasick since we shoved off, to say 
nothing about seeing enemy ships or planes. 
So you see, mom, there's really nothing to 
worry about. 

A fellow was telling me to ." 

Suddenly, the sharp call, "submarine, 



ahead," breaks through the silence. As 
the youth hurries to his post, a torpedo 
strikes the ship, killing all in its deadly 
path. Water pours into the gaping hole 
and silently the ship lowers into the sea. 
Too late to lower lifeboats, now. It's sink 
or swim. Swim? where? Nothing but 
water hundreds of miles in every direc- 
tion. 

The moon still shines brightly down on 
the ghastly sight of men, floundering in the 
water only to become too cold and weary 
to go on, except to a watery grave. With 
them goes the youth and the unfinished 
letter which his mother shall never read. 

The same moon shines down on a farm 
house in the country. Inside is seated an 
elderly woman and a young girl who is 
speaking. 

"We're going to have five rooms on the 
bottom floor. Don't you think that will 
be a good size, Mrs. Green?" 

"I certainly do, Sally, and so will Tom. 
He always wanted to have a nice big house. 
But, I'll feel much better when he gets 
home and you two are married." 

"Oh, don't worry, Mrs. Green," said Sally, 
laughing. 

Suddenly Mrs. Green turned pale and a 
strange look stole over her face. 

"Why, what's the matter. Don't you feel 
well?" asked Sally. 

For a minute she didn't speak. Then, 

"I'm all right, Sally, but for a minute, 
I had such a strange feeling, just as if 
Tom was here in this room, kissing me good 
bye as he did when he left. But, I must 
have just been dreaming. Yet, it seemed so 
real." 

The moon passed behind a dark cloud. 

Irene Metz '43 



WHAT ABOUT THE PEOPLE OF 
THIS WORLD? 

Before I start, I think you'll all agree with 
me that this is a cockeyed world ? You do ? 
Good, I thought so. For those of you who 
don't agree — read carefully! Sometimes, I 
think philosophy would be interesting — that 
is, philosophy of this world — the whys and 
wherefors. There is one factor which can 
cause the greatest amount of philosophy, 
war. War, is the greatest upset that can 
happen to any country and its people. If 



28 



THE TATTLER 



any of you think at all, (I sometimes wonder 
if any of us do) think sometimes of what's 
going to happen after this war. "Allright," 
you say — "now, right after we win, we'll" 
— : and there, I stop you — "Right after we 
win." Now, if I were to say that I thought 
we wouldn't win, I would be called an un- 
patriotic American — a pessimist — or in good 
American slang — crazy or a jerk. So, I'll 
agree (and of course I think we will, but not 
as easily as the majority of the American 
people seem to think) and you continue 
"Right after we win" — and then a lot of 
beating around the bush which ends with 
the general vague — "You can't tell, the big- 
shots will decide. 

To continue my little thought let's pick 
some of the most conceivable plans: — a 
league of nations, controlling the economic 
wealth of countries; an international police 
force; the dividing of the Axis lands into 
sections to be controlled by the different 
Allied powers; or a combination of any of 
these. Of course, there are points for and 
against all these plans; but instead of 
worrying about the countries as a whole, 
let's think of the people in those countries. 
No matter what plan is developed, some- 
thing and somebody will suffer. Now, are 
the German, Japanese, and Italian people 
any worse than we are ? There are a great 
number of people who will and do condemn 
Germans and Japanese in this country — 
without stopping to think that perhaps the 
person condemned for his nationality is 



just as, if not more, patriotic than they are. 
That's a good piece of advice for anybody — 
be broad-minded. See both sides to every 
question. Think of the other guy. In other 
words, the Golden Rule; and for those of 
you who have to stop and think: — this is the 
Golden Rule (in simple language) — "Do un- 
to others as you would have them do* unto 
you." Perhaps, if people would think of 
that more often — . 

After the last World War, in the making 
of the Treaty of Versailles, the statesmen 
were governed by a feeling of revenge — re- 
venge on the German people. Won't there 
be that same feeling after this war ? There 
are those who say, "What do we care? The 
Germans started it, they brought it on 
themsleves. Let them pay for it." But did 
they start it? Of course, in the literal 
sense for actual conquests, yes. But why? 
If the German people had not been so sup- 
presed after the last war — would they have 
had any desire for a new form of govern- 
ment? It's a big question. So I again ask 
you — What's going to happen to the people 
of this world ? And since the fate of the 
people rests on the fate of the nations — 
What's going to happen to the nations? 
We all wonder. One thing we are sure of, 
the world will be passed onto us, we of the 
younger generation. Whatever mess our 
forbears make of it must be straightened out 
by us. On us rests the fate of the people. 
So, we must prepare. 

Arlene Sabo— '43 



D 



S*5»g 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



29 




Front Row: Thelma Packard, Edward Golash, Doris Sincage, John Barrus, Doris 

Dymerski, and Miss Barrus. 
Second Row: Dorothy Stimson, Wilbur Shumway, David West, Charles Bartlett, 

Bette Lou Harlow, and Mildred Shaw. 
Absent: Sylvia Clary. 



Tattler Staff 



Editor-in-Chief, John Barrus '42 

Assistant Editors, Wilbur Shumway '42, Betty Harlow '43 

Business Manager, Sylvia Clary '42 

Assistants, David West '42, Dorothy Stimson '42 

Alumni Editor, Thelma Packard '42 

Exchange Editor, Mildred Shaw '43 

Sports Editors, Doris Dymerski '42, Edward Golash '42 

Literary Editor, Doris Sincage '42 

Joke Editor, Charles Bartlett '42 

Faculty Adviser, Annetta Barrus 



30 



THE TATTLER 




Front Row: Audrey Jones, Betty Damon, Thelma Packard, Miss Barrus. 
Second Row: Charles Bartlett, Ruth Beebe, Arlene Sabo, David West. 
Absent: Sylvia Clary. 



Forensic League 



Officers of the Forensic League for 1941-42; 
President — Ruth Beebe 
Vice President — Charles Bartlett 
Corresponding Secretary — Sylvia Clary 
Recording Secretary — Arlane Sabo 
Treasure — Mildred Shaw 
Executive Committee — Bette Lou Harlow, 
Wilbur Shumway, David West. 

The food sales and card parties given dur- 
ing the summer raised funds sufficient for 
all the years' expenses. 

The valley league debates were fairly 
successful, placing Williamsburg in third 
place. At the pre-state tournament, held at 
Northampton, the Williamsburg debat- 
teams placed in the finals, achieving a tie for 
second place in that tournament. Davi 1 
West and Thelma Packard place in the finals 
in their division; and Sylvia Clary placed 



second in the finals in oratorical declama- 
tions. 

On March 27, 1942, eight students with 
Mrs. Warner and Miss Barrus, set out for 
Hyannis where the state tournament was 
held this year. Williamsburg registered 
the following speakers: 
Affirmative debate team: — Ruth Beebe, 

Arlene Sabo 
Negative debate team: Charles Bartlett 

Sylvia Clary 
Dramatic Declamations: — Betty Damon, 

Ruth Beebe 
Humorous Declamations: — Thelma Packard, 

Audrey Jones 
Oratorical Declamations: — David West, Syl- 
via Clary 

The school is very proud of Sylvia who 
(Continued on Page 37) 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



31 




Front Row: Lena Guyette, Betty Damon, Thelma Packard, Ruth Beebe, Jean 
Warner, Doris Sincage, Arlene Sabo. 

Second Row: Charles Bartlett, Mildred Shaw, Edna Shaw, Irene Metz, Shirley 
Knight, Jean Crone, June Colburn, Eloise Bartlett, Lester Shaw, William Bisbee. 

Absent: Sylvia Clary. 



Pro Merito 



The Pro Merito Society is made up of 18 
members; eight Seniors and 10 Juniors. 
The officers elected for this year were: 

Seniors: 

President — Jean Warner 

Vice President — Thelma Packard 

Secretary — Sylvia Clary 
Juniors: 

President — Jean Crone 

Vice-President — Arlene Sabo 

Secretary — Mary Noyes 

On October 24, 1941, the society conductad 
an assembly program. It consisted of arti- 
cles written by the students on what Pro 
Merito stands for and a history of our own 
chapter. Colored movies were also shown 
of last year's Spring Convention at Smith 
Academy in Hatfield. 



This year the State Society decided to 
hold a State Convention only once a year 
instead of twice as had been previously 
clone. In place of this meeting it held 
small zone meetings so that the group could 
meet in the smaller school. We attended, 
100%, the one held in Belchertown. Ac- 
companied by Miss Dunphy, four cars went 
over after school on Friday, October 24. 

After registering, we were shown through 
the building until time for the usual business 
meeting. Supper was served by the ladies 
of the church. With our stomachs full, we 
returned to the assembly hall to listen to the 
speakers. After listening to two interest- 
ing ones, we danced until time to come home, 
-veryone had an excellent time. 

This spring the State Convention to be 
held at Rockland was cancelled because of 
the present situation. 



32 



THE TATTLER 




Front Row: Neil Damon, Robert Algustoski, Edward Golash, Francis O'Brien, 
Captain Harry Warner, George Molloy, John O'Brien, and Michael Batura. 

Second Row: Clifford Thayer, John Polwrek, Coach Mullaly, Donald Harry, and 
John Barrus. 

Absent: Thomas Alguttoski. 



Baseball 



Eighteen candidates reported to Coach 
Mullaly for the first practice. Out of this 
number only four veterans returned from 
last year's team and one left the team to go 
to work before the season ended. Because 
of the present situation of the world, 
Williamsburg High has but five games 
scheduled to play. The team has lost the 
games it has played thus far, but expect to 
have a better team next year, for but three 
players will be lost through graduation. 
They are Harry Warner, Michael Batura, 
and Edward Golash. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



33 




Front Row: Michael Batura, Robert Algustoski, Edward Golash, Fran?is O'Brien, 
and John O'Brien. 

Back Row: David West, Manager Harry Warner, Karl Hillenbrand, and Coach 
Franklin Mullaly. 

Absent: Thomas Algustoski, James McAllister, George Molloy, Francis Dymerski, 
and Neil Damon. 



Basketball 



Williamsburg High had a successful sea- 
son this year with a record of eight wins and 
eight defeats. Coach Mullaly had three 
veterans, Michael Batura, Jack O'Brien, 
Edward Golash, and many new comers, so he 
developed a good team. For the second 
time in the history of sports at Burgy, the 
team defeated Clarke School. Most of the 
defeats that Burgy suffered were by very 
small margins. The Green Wave was tied 
with Huntington for third place in the 
Franklin League. Huntington was a new 
comer to the League. Michael Batura and 
Edward Golash will be lost to the team, be- 
cause they are due to graduate in June, but 
Coach Mullaly hopes to produce a better 
team next year, if conditions improve for 
the better of this country. 



BASKETBALL SCORES 



Williamsburg 


21 


South Hadley 


29 


Williamsburg 


28 


Belchertown 


26 


Williamsburg 


16 


Clarke 


23 


Williamsburg 


27 


Charlemont 


24 


Williamsburg 


28 


Alumni 


25 


Williamsburg 


29 


Huntington 


28 


Williamsburg 


24 


Powers 


26 


Williamsburg 


27 


Clarke 


26 


Williamsburg 


21 


Wilmington, Vt. 


28 


Williamsburg 


34 


Sanderson 


26 


Williamsburg 


31 


Chester 


43 


Williamsburg 


33 


Charlemont 


27 


Williamsburg 


30 


Huntington 


39 


Williamsburg 


30 


Powers 


36 


Williamsburg 


38 


Chester 


45 


Williamsburg 


40 


Sanderson 


24 



34 



THE TATTLER 




first Row: Michael Batura, Harry Warner, Robert Algustoski, Edward Golash, 
and Francis O'Brien. 

Second Row: Manager John O'Brien, Henry Brisbois, and Coach Franklin Mullal". 
Absent: Thomas Algu.toski. and Fiancis Dymerski. 



Track 



This year Williamsburg High School had 
a track team which participated in the meet 
at M. S. C. and at the Cummington Fair. 
Although the team lacked the necessary 
grounds to train for track, they were in 
shape for the basketball season. Track 
took the place of soccer, which had to be 
given up, because of the lack of the neces- 
sary funds. Although the track team did 
not have a very successful season, they did 
enjoy tra:k, which helped to build up a 
character in the Williamsburg High School 
boys that participated. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



35 



Girls' Basketball 



This year the girls were coached by a new 
coach, Miss Webber. At the beginning of 
the year, were selected the following officers : 
Co-Captains Bernice Golash and Doris Dy- 
merski. Manager, Charlotte Otis. 

Although they worked hard, the season 
was not too successful but they did have fun 
playing. However, they hope to have a 
much better record next year as most of 
the girls are returning, and only one mem- 
ber Doris Dymerski, will be lost through 
Graduation. 



Here is the outcome of the games: 




Williamsburg 


28 


Charlemont 


36 


Williamsburg 


19 


Wilmington 


26 


Williamsburg 


15 


Powers 


28 


Williamsburg 


14 


Chester 


37 


Williamsburg 


31 


Sanderson 


29 


Williamsburg 


23 


Charlemont 


29 


Williamsburg 


23 


Powers 


29 


Williamsburg 


21 


Sanderson 


17 


Williamsburg 


14 


Alumni 


20 



Jokes 



Miss Barrus: Josephine 0! what's the mat- 
ter with you, you act as if your mind was 
30 miles away. 

Harry W: No it isn't. I know where he 
lives. He lives closer than that, Miss 
Barrus. 



John Barrus: Mr. .Mullaly, did you ever see 

colored doughnut holes. 
Mr. Mullaly: Why-y-no-oo — I haven't. 
John: Neither have I. 



Mr. Foster: What makes the Yangtze 

River overflow each year? 
Student: Water. 



John Barrus: Talking about rainstorms Mr. 
Foster, did you hear the story about the 
farmer who raced the thundershower 
home and only got the tailboard wet. 

Turk: No! Some horse. 

C. B.: No! Some story. 



Mr. Walker: In current events: "Quit talk- 
ing and watch me, I'm the important man 
around here. 

Dave West: "Gee." (Dennis Day) 



36 



THE TATTLER 



Alumni Notes 



Class of 1941 

Fred Allen — Stevens Arms. 

Edward Ames — Bosch, Springfield. 

Ralph Bates — Prophylactic Brush Com- 
pany. 

Russell Bisbee — Wentworth School, Bos- 
ton. 

June Bowker — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Josephine Cerpovicz — North Adams 
Teacher's College. 

Richard Culver — Conway, Mass. 

Mary Daniels — Westover Field, Chicopee. 

Faith Dresser — Plans to enter M. S. C. 
in fall. 

Leo Dymerski — Springfield Armory. 

Dorothy Fisher— Crane's Paper Mill, 
Dalton. 

Constance Granger— Smith's Vocational 
School. 

Harold Hillenbrand — Work. 

Hope Jarvis — Northampton, Mass. 

Robert Kearney — Prophylactic Brush 
Company. 

Fred King — Hampden Mills, Easthamp- 
ton. 

Henry Kopka — Prophylactic Brush Com- 
pany. 

Rita Kulas — Northampton Commercial 
College. 

Gerald Larkin — Springfield Armory. 

Robert Newell— Pratt & Whitney, Hart- 
ford. 

Robert McAllister — Spjringfield Armory. 

Lucius Merritt — First National Bank, 
Northampton. 

Lida Miner — Office of Williamsburg High. 

Esther Mollison — Northampton, Mass. 

Adelbert Roberge — First National Store, 
Williamsburg. 

Phyllis Sutherland — Westover Field, 
Chicopee. 

Jeannette Wright — Crane's Paper Mill, 
Dalton. 



ALUMNI GRADUATES 

Violet Arnold, Bridgewater Teacher's Col- 
lege. 

Ruth Black, North Adams Teacher's College. 

Roberta Colburn, North Adams Teacher's 
College. 

Margaret Lenihan, St. Joseph's College, 
Hartford. 

Eleanor Swenson, Smith College, Northamp- 
ton. 

Vernon West, Bridgewater Teacher's Col- 
lege. 

ALUMNI MARRIAGES 

Bette Tetro Buford, '40, to Charles Rogers. 

Margery E. Damon, '34, to David B. Thomas. 

Walter Golash, '36, to Eunice Parker. 

Gertrude Heath, '35, to David Jennings. 

Ruth Ellen Newell, '38, to Thomas W. Bar- 
rus, '30. 

Doris M. Sabo, '39, to Orman G. Elmes, Jr. 

Eleanor Wheeler, '35, to Harold A. Ballway. 

ALUMNI BIRTHS 
Son to Marion Sabo Ames. 
Daughter to Pauline Packard Atherton. 
Daughter to Jean Everett Hemenway. 
Daughter to Irene Porter Parker. 
Son to Henry Soltys. 
Son to Marguerite Sabo Webb. 

ALUMNI OFFICERS 

President — Raymond Bradford. 
Vice-President — Edward Foster. 
Secretary — Ethel Ryan. 
Treasurer — Margery Thomas. 
Executive Committee — Rita Riley, Austin 
< 1 1 Mosher, Jr. 



1925 



1927 



ALUMNI IN THE SERVICE 

Alvan Barrus, Fort Belvoir, Va. 

Robert Smiley, Lubbott Flying Field, 
Texas. 

Ronald Emrick, Fort Belvoir, Va. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



37 



1928 



Leroy Weeks, Fort McLellan, Ala. 



1929 



Davis Snow, Australia. 



1930 



1931 



1932 



1933 



1934 



1935 



1936 



Gordon Nash, Bangor, Me. 

L 
Raymond Lee, Aberdeen Proving 

Grounds, Maryland. 

Edward Sheehan, overseas. 

I 
R. F. Burke, Jr., Boston, Mass. 

George K. Rustemeyer, New Calodonia. 

I 

Richard Field, Denver, Colo. 

Chester King, Camp Lee, Va. 
Nancy Sheehan, overseas. 

Allen Bisbee, Indiantown Gap, Penn. 
Rodney Galbraith, overseas. 
Bessie Muraski, Camp Edwards, Mass. 
Hans Nietsche, Fort Benning, Ga. 
Catherine Paul, Fort Mason, Calif. 
Edwin Russell, Fort Bragg, N. C. 

Vardic Golash, Australia. 

Walter Golash, Camp Edwards, Mass. 

Francis Packard, Camp Edwards, Mass. 

Howard Willson, England. 

1937 

Edward Fontaine, Newport, R. I. 

William Howe, California. 
1938 

Douglas Fairbanks, Portsmouth, N. H. 
1939 

Carlton Field, England. 
George Warner 

# ♦ ♦ 
FORENSIC LEAGUE 

(Continued from Page 30) 

placed in the finals at Hyannis; the debate 
teams reached the semi-finals. During the 
year, the affirmative debate team lost only 
two debates. 

On Sunday, March 30, 1942, we concluded 
a trip which proved very interesting, es- 
pecially to those who had never been to the 
Cape before. Of singular note was the 



Cape Cod Canal which separates the cape 
from the mainland; and, which, when cross- 
ed at night, proves to be a beautiful sight 
with all the lights reflected in the waters of 
the canal. Hyannis can boast a beautiful 
high school building with the ocean practi- 
cally in its back yard. 

In respect to next year's work, plans are 
very indefinite owing to the present emer- 
gency. However, despite war conditions and 
sacrifices entailed, forensic activity will take 
its usual place in the high school program. 



EDITORIALS 

(Continued from Page 21) 

a hundred drowned. To the average reader 
these words carry little weight. If he hap- 
pens to lose a friend or relative the horror 
of war then strikes him full in the face. 
When peace comes we must remember that 
it is to each individual who so gallantly 
gave his life and work that we owe thanks. 

Do not think for a moment that I think 
that the general, the salesman, and the 
president of a plant deserve no credit. They 
do — but the same as we do not "judge a 
man by what he wears" neither must we 
by the position he holds. For what good 
would a general be without his soldiers or 
a president of a concern without his ma- 
chine operators? Every single person in 
a business contributes to the complete out- 
put of that particular corporation. Thus 
in turn does each individual contribute to 
his town, his country, and in the end to 
the unity or disunity of the whole world. 
Thus we see that each and all of us have 
a particular place in this picture. 

To us who are graduating the full mean- 
ing of this strikes home. For now we are 
on our own. What we do and accomplish 
depends on our own initiative and ability. 
Often in the future, as we have sometimes 
in the past, we will lose hope and become 
despondent. But we must never give up for 
there will always be a way. We will not 
all be generals or presidents nor even skilled 
artisans but we will be important just the 
same for each of us will have a definite 
job to do. Let us remember that all honest 
labor is praiseworthy and therefore, to hold 
whatever position we have with dignity. 

Sylvia Clary— '42. 



Compliments of 

Packard's Soda Shoppe i 

Opposite Town Hall 
SCHOOL SUPPLIES, MAGAZINES, GREETING CARDS 

Films and Developing 
OUR OWN ICE CREAM FOUNTAIN & BOOTH SERVICE | 

i 

, ! 

. Compliments of | 



i 



R. A. MacLEOD NURSERY 

LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 

Willamsburg, Mass. j 

, Telephone 211 Old Goshen Road j 

i 

CHILSON'S SHOPS 

W. Leroy Chilson 
AWNINGS — VENETIAN BLINDS 
I FURNITURE COVERINGS & UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 

! Furniture Upholstering Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 

1 Harness Shop Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Slip Covers, Cushions Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 

34 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



TODD'S 

NORTHAMPTON 
SWEATERS SPORTSWEAR 

ALL WOOL SHETLANDS AND TWEEDS 



i 



j Thorough business training was never so essential for so many people. 
Northampton Commercial College 

John C. P.ckett, Principal 
,, The School of Thoroiighness" 



47th YEAR 



47th YEAR 



Hillcrest Farm 

Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 


Compliments of 


SINGLE COMB 


First National 


RHODE ISLAND REDS 


Store 


Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 


WILLIAMSBURG 


Williamsburg, Mass. 





C. F. JENKINS 



STATIONERY — GREETING CARDS — MEDICINES 



ICE CREAM 



WILLIAMSBURG 



I 



I 

MASSACHUSETTS j 

i 



Compliments of 



i Cnas. A. Bowl 



?er 



Hardware, Paint 

and 

General Merchandise 



Telephone 245 



Williamsburg 



Newell Funeral H 



unerai nome 



R. D. NEWELL 



74 King Street 



Northampton 



I 

j For the young man who graduates 
this year we have everything that 
he will need for this important 
occasion. 

Merritt Clark & Co. 

NORTHAMPTON 



Bergmann 



s Bat 



erv. 



BREAD AND PASTRY 



16 Briggs Street 



I Tel. 390 
j 



Easthampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 



C. O. Carls 



on 



GOSHEN 



Socon^ Service 



Slat 



ion 



Dial 275 



WILIAMSBURG 



Good Shoes 

Correctly Fitted 

Reasonably Priced 

David Boot Shop 

221 Main Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments 
of 

E. J. Gusetti 
HAYDENVILLE 



A. Solt^S 



MEATS 



GROCERIES 



VEGETABLES 



Telephone 223 



Haydenville 



Good Things to Eat 



Beck 



m a n n s 



NORTHAMPTON 



Candy Mailed 
Refreshing Sodas 



Tasty Pastries 



Fine Ice Cream 



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Village Hill Nursery 

ALPINES, PERENNIALS 

ANNUAL PLANTS 

and 

HERBS 

WILLIAMSBURG 

All Kinds of 
Rough and Finished Lumber 

PURE MAPLE SYRUP 

FANCY CAKE SUGAR 

and SOFT SUGAR 

Packard Bros. 



( 

| Tel. 4633 

i 



Goshen 

Williamsburg R. F. D. 



Williamsburg L-iarage 

C. K. HATHAWAY 

Tel. 4351 

SERVICE STATION 
Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 

Williamsburg, Mass. 

BEST WISHES 

TO THE 
CLASS OF 1942 

Conen Bros. 
NORTHAMPTON 



Purity Milk Cap Co. 



WILLIAMSBURG 



Tel. 294 



P. 0. B. 207 



HillB 



ros. 

Printed Lawns for 
Summer Dresses 



Socks 
Main Street 



Pajamas 

Northampton 



Compliments of 



H 



H, 



F ; 



app^ nonie Jnarm 

A. H. RHOADES 



Goshen, Mass. 

Hard Wood Maple Products 

Tel.. 3623 Williamsburg Exchange 



Class Rings 
Trophies 



Jewelry 
Medals 



E. J. Gare & Son 



112 Main Street 



Northampton j 

i 



ELY FUNERAL HOME 

CHARLES E. ELY 
Telephone 1292-W Northampton 

Lady Assistant 



Compliments of 



R. F. BURKE 



WILLIAMSBURG I 

i 

i 

i 

MODERN EDUCATION [ 

Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes ' 

which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects I 

in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after.. A little | 

fore-sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will | 

help them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. I 



O. T. DEWHURST j 

OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS j 

201 Main Street Telephone 184-W Northampton ' 

i 

J. W. PARSONS & SON | 

TRACTORS AND FARM MACHINERY j 

131 Bridge Street Telephone 2885 Northampton f 

I ! 



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Bre^uet s 



SERVICE STATION 

Mobilgas Mobiloil 

Mobilubrication 



Florence 



Mass. 



Compliments of 

James R. Mansrield 

and Son 

FUNERAL HOME 

South Main Street 
Haydenville Mass. 



Harlo 



7 

w s 



Fine Luggage 
Bill Folds Keytainers 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

24 Center Street Telephone 155-W 

Northampton 

When in need of 

Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes 
for Men and Boys 

TRY 

The Florence Store 

90 Maple Street Florence 

Telephone 828-W J. A. Long-tin 

Service — Quality — Satisfaction 



Hardware, Sporting Goods, 

Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis 
and Camping Items 

Foster -Farrar Co. 

162 Main Street 
Northampton Mass. 

Brooks Qara^e 

Colonial Esso Dealer 

GAS— OIL— ACCESSORIES 

ELECTRIC WELDING 

Route 9 Berkshire Trail 

Goshen, Mass. 

Compliments of 



Herlih^ s 



DRY GOODS STORE 



76 Maple Street 



Florence 



Jones The Florist 

BULBS PERENNIALS 

CUT FLOWERS 

FLORAL DESIGNS 



Tel. 4331 



Haydenville 



PAINTS AND WALL PAPER 



PIERCE S PAINT STORE 



TEL. 1207 



196 MAIN ST. 



Compliments of 




Compliments of 


Shumway> & Rile^ 




National 


PLUMBING & HEATING 




^hoe Repairing 


SHEET METAL WORK 




John Mateja, Prop. 


Center St. Northampton 




15 Masonic Street 


Tel. 176 




Tel. 826-W 


Ward E. Shumway, Prop. 




Northampton, Mass. 


Charles \\". Wells 




Compliments of 


R.C.A. RADIO 


John 1. Graham Estate 


KELVIN ATOR REFRIGERATORS 






ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 




COAL — OIL — ICE 


Tel. 4861 Haydenville 




WILLIAMSBURG 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 



FOR EVERY SPORT 



T. A. PURSEGLOVE 



15 State Street 



Compliments of 



F. N. Graves & Son 



Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

Woodworm 
Beauty Salon 

O. J. Bonneau, Prop. 
200 Main St. 

PHONE 2390 
Northmapton, Mass.. 



SMART WEARING APPAREL FOR 

YOUNG MEN 

AT MODERATE PRICES 

Harr^ Daniel Associates 

Northampton, Mass.. 



I Trie E. & J. Ci^ar Co. 

! 

! WHOLESALE TOBACCONISTS 

1 

! 23 Main St. 

i 

| Northampton, Mass. 



Ed. Rvan S 

Esso Servicenter 

Gasoline — Motor Oil 

Tires, Batteries & Accessories 



Route 9 



Haydenville, Mass. 



Compliments 



of 



Moriarty Bros. 

Furniture 



Northampton, Mass. 



Beebe s Lunch 



A Good Place to Eat 



TOASTED SANDWICHES 



Berkshire Trail 



A. L. Beebe, Prop. 



HAYDENVILLE 



Compliments of 



I 

i 
j 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

The j 

i 
I 

Haydenville Savings Bank 1 

i 
I 

i 

z 

I 

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9 

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Compliments of j 

i 



Northampton Street Railway Co. 



EDWARD A. PELLISSIER 

General Manager 



Franklin King;, Jr. 
INSURANCE 

277 Main Street 
Northampton Mass. Phone 610 



Our students record of consistent achieve- 
ment is the best indorsement that one 
could ask for. 

Pizzitola Music Studios 

''The School of Achievement" 

BANJO — MANDOLIN 

GUITAR — ACCORDION 

142 Main St., Northampton Tel. 2650 

Compliments of 

The Clar£ Farm 

Try Our Maple Syrup 

For Farm and Village Property 

Consult Silas Snow 

Telephone 3563 
WILLIAMSBURG 



WE BUY AND SELL 



I D 



E S 

F P 

E M 

N A 

S T 

E S 

Postmaster 

Worthington Mass. 



Compliments of 



A Friend 



Compliments of 

Clirton E. Qoddard 

OPTICIAN 

Easthampton, Mass. 

Compliments of 

Candle Li^nt Den 
Goshen Rd. Williamsburg 

Compliments of 

H. Q. Stanton 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

West Chesterfield, Mass. 

Telephone 2523 

Dealing's Timepiece Service 

116 Main St. Northampton, Mass. 
Adjusted and Repaired 
so that you can depend 
on the accuracy of your 
timepieces. 

Our work is backed by 
years of experience and 
thousands of satisfied 
customers. 
For correct time call 3511 




ALLISON SPENCE 

100 Main Street, Northampton 



Photographer to Williamsburg High School 

I 

Since 1917 with two exceptions 



THANKS BURGY" 



I 

j 

j CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R, BISBEE 

1 Tel. Chesterfield 2143 Tel. Chesterfield 2141 

I BISBEE BROTHERS 

Dealers in all kinds of 
Grain, Feed, Fertilizers Salt, Cement, and Agricultural Tools 

Bird & Sons Roofing Paper Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material High Grade Grass Seed 

Oliver Plows and Cultivators 

Norfolk Paint 

Get our prices on anything you need 
before ordering elsewhere 

STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 

Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg, Mass., R. F. D„ 1 | 

I i 



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